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Articles | Christine Eberle | June 26, 2013
R v Telus Communications Co (2013): Police Need Wiretap Warrant to Seize Text Messages

Category: The Charter, Legal Rights (Sections 7-14)

Introduction On March 27, 2013, the Supreme Court of Canada ruled[1] that the interception of text messages requires wiretap authorization[2] found under Part VI of the Criminal Code.[3] Part VI of the Criminal Code protects private communications, such as phone calls, from being intercepted by the

Articles | Christine Chong | June 25, 2013
Federation of Law Societies of Canada (FLSC) v Canada: Lawyers exempt from obligation under proceeds of crime law

Category: The Charter, Legal Rights (Sections 7-14)

Introduction On April 4, 2013, the British Columbia Court of Appeal released its judgment on whether lawyers and law firms are obliged to keep records of clients who may be involved in money laundering and terrorist funding.[1] The Court considered whether

Articles | Ken Dickerson | June 20, 2013
Foiled Again: Calgary Police Breach Privacy Rights with Grow-Op Electricity Monitoring

Category: The Charter, Legal Rights (Sections 7-14)

A new decision of the Alberta Court of Appeal on section 8 of the Charter, the right to be secure against unreasonable search or seizure, reinforces privacy protections and makes it harder for police to collect evidence of illegal drug production.[1] The decision, R. v.

Articles | Christine Eberle | May 29, 2013
R v Cole (2012): Can Police Search Your Workplace Computer Without a Warrant?

Category: The Charter, Legal Rights (Sections 7-14)

This article was written by a law student for the general public. Introduction On October 19, 2012, the Supreme Court of Canada ruled that employees have a reasonable expectation of privacy in information on their workplace computers.[1] As a result of

Articles | Leah McDaniel | August 7, 2012
R v Willier (2010): Does the Right to Counsel Include a Right to a Specific Lawyer?

Category: The Charter, Legal Rights (Sections 7-14)

INTRODUCTION In R v Willier,[1] the Supreme Court of Canada considered the limits and scope of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms guarantee to a lawyer in the event of arrest or detention. The case was one of three cases[2]decided by the Supreme Court

Articles | Leah McDaniel | August 7, 2012
Carter v Canada (Attorney General) (2012): B.C. Court Rules that Ban on Assisted Suicide is Unconstitutional

Category: The Charter, Legal Rights (Sections 7-14), Equality Rights (Section 15)

INTRODUCTION On June 15, 2012, the Supreme Court of British Columbia rendered its long-awaited decision in Carter v Canada (Attorney General),[1] a case that considers whether a full prohibition on assisted suicide is contrary to the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Under section

Articles | Leah McDaniel | July 31, 2012
R v Sinclair (2010): No Constitutional Right to Have a Lawyer Present During Police Interrogation

Category: The Charter, Legal Rights (Sections 7-14)

INTRODUCTION In R v Sinclair,[1] the Supreme Court considered the limits and scope of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms guarantee to a lawyer in the event of arrest or detention. Under section 10(b) of the Charter: Everyone has the right on arrest or detention …

Articles | Brent Thompson | June 11, 2011
The “Khadr Resolution” & the Conservative Party convention, 2011

Category: The Charter, Democratic Rights (Sections 3-5), Mobility Rights (Section 6), Legal Rights (Sections 7-14), Minority Language Education Rights (Section 23)

During the lead-up to the 2011 Conservative Party convention in Ottawa, media attention turned to a proposal termed by some as the “Khadr Resolution”.[1] The resolution was inspired by the case of Omar Khadr, a young Canadian citizen who fought alongside

Articles | Adam Badari | September 30, 2010
Westendorp v. The Queen – Can a City Prohibit Street Prostitution? (1983)

Category: The Charter, Legal Rights (Sections 7-14), Federalism

In 1983, the Supreme Court of Canada decided a case about the division of powers in Canadian federalism.[1] The Court had to decide whether the City of Calgary had the constitutional authority to make it illegal for a person to be on the

Articles | Jim Young | August 13, 2010
Government Appeals Latest Court Order on Omar Khadr’s Constitutional Rights

Category: The Charter, Legal Rights (Sections 7-14)

On July 12, 2010, exactly seven days after the Federal Court gave the government one week to come up with an effective remedy for its violation of Omar Khadr’s rights, [1] the government has announced it will appeal.[2] The decision of Federal Court Judge Russel

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Protection of Privacy Personal information provided is collected in accordance with Section 33(c) of the Alberta Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (the FOIP Act) and will be protected under Part 2 of that Act. It will be used for the purpose of managing CCS’ email subscription lists. Should you require further information about collection, use and disclosure of personal information, or to unsubscribe, please contactAdministrator, Centre for Constitutional Studies, 448D Law Centre, University of Alberta, Edmonton AB, T6G 2H5, Tel: 780-492-5681, Email: ccslaw@ualberta.ca. You may unsubscribe from our email lists at any time.