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Speakers and Panels | December 11, 2013
Pamela Palmater “Section 35’s Empty Shell of Constitutional Promise” Pt. 1

Category: Videos, Speakers and Panels

The 25th Annual McDonald Lecture hosted by the Centre for Constitutional Studies features Professor Pamela Palmater. In this lecture Professor Palmater argues that the federal government has failed to meet its obligations under the treaties signed with Canada’s aboriginal peoples. Professor Palmater is head of the Centre for Indigenous Governance at Ryerson University and was the runner up in the Assembly of First Nations leadership elections for national chief in 2012.

Speakers and Panels | November 8, 2013
The Fight for Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Equality in Canada – Pt. 4 (Q & A)

Category: Equality Rights (Section 15), Videos, Speakers and Panels

Question and answer with Delwin Vriend, Barbara Findlay QC, and Dr. Kris Wells.

Speakers and Panels | November 8, 2013
The Fight for Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Equality in Canada – Pt. 3

Category: Equality Rights (Section 15), Videos, Speakers and Panels

Dr. Kris Wells of the Institute for Minority Studies and Services speaks about sexual minority rights in education.

Speakers and Panels | November 8, 2013
The Fight for Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Equality in Canada – Pt. 1

Category: Equality Rights (Section 15), Videos, Speakers and Panels

Delwin Vriend reflects on his landmark case (Vriend v Alberta) which resulted in inclusion of sexual orientation as a protected ground in Alberta’s Human Rights Legislation.

Speakers and Panels | September 10, 2013
Constitutional Desuetude Pt. 2 (Q & A)

Category: Videos, Speakers and Panels

Question and answer with Richard Albert on Constitutional Desuetude.

Speakers and Panels | September 10, 2013
Constitutional Desuetude Pt. 1

Category: Videos, Speakers and Panels

Scholars have demonstrated that written constitutions may be amended informally, for instance by judicial interpretation, statutory law, or executive action. But it has yet to be fully appreciated that written constitutions may also be informally amended when a constitutional provision falls into desuetude*. Whereas other forms of informal amendment leave the constitutional text entrenched, unchanged, and politically valid, constitutional desuetude leaves the text entrenched and unchanged but renders it politically invalid.

In this Lecture, Professor Albert will illustrate and theorize the phenomenon of constitutional desuetude with reference to the Canadian and United States Constitutions.

*Desuetude: The condition or state into which anything falls when one ceases to use or practice it; a state of disuse.

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